WEEK 2, DAY 1, YANKEES 4

Our first day back after our first day off! We all look rested and fabulous.

As all you obsessive brilliant daily readers of this blog know, I brought my dog to rehearsal on Sunday. Today, like the true professional that I am, I left him home. Immediately, I was accosted by the cast and crew. “Where’s your dog?” they all asked. “I left him at home today, like the true professional I am,” I responded. Most didn’t even try to hide their grave disappointment. If it was put to a vote, they would’ve undoubtedly voted for Rocco to come in and me to stay at home. And frankly, I don’t blame them. When my dog comes to rehearsal, he hangs out and cuddles up in their laps and looks lovingly in their eyes. When I come to rehearsal, I sit in the back, looking alternately grim and terrified. I’d rather have my dog come to rehearsal instead of me, too.

So though dog-less, we still managed to ehearse a slew of lively scenes and fights today, including a newly rewritten (and pivotal) scene that happens late in the show.

SPOILER ALERT — STOP READING IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW THE NOT-TOO-SUPRISING PLOT TWIST I AM ABOUT TO REVEAL! AND FOR GOD’S SAKE, DON’T START READING UNTIL YOU SEE THE CAPITAL LETTERS AGAIN! DID YOU STOP READING YET? IF YOU HAVEN’T, DON’T SAY I DIDN’T WARN YOU! IF YOU DID STOP READING, THEN I’M JUST WRITING THE REST OF THIS SENTENCE FOR NO REASON WHATSOVER. SORRY.

So as the show nears its dramatic conclusion, Sarah (the blind librarian) comes to the realization that the man she’s dating (The Toxic Avenger) is actually a mutant freak. None-too-happy with this situation, Sarah breaks up with Toxie. It’s a tricky scene, because it needs to be in the tone of the rest of the show (outrageously funny) while at the same time the audience needs to feel the pain that both Toxie and Sarah are experiencing.

OKAY, YOU CAN PROBABLY START READING HERE AND NOT HATE ME FOR SPOILING ANYTHING. BUT I ALSO THINK THAT YOU CAN READ THE ABOVE PLOT POINT WHICH YOU SKIPPED AND STILL ENJOY THE SHOW. I MEAN, IT’S REALLY NOT THAT SURPRISING A PLOT POINT. IT’S NOT LIKE EVERYONE’S REALLY DEAD AND THE WHOLE SHOW WAS A DREAM OR SOMETHING.

Anyhoo, in the show’s initial regional production, the scene mainly relied on laughs. In this production, the scene is rewritten and played for pathos as well as laughs. So TonyAwardBoy John Rando was hard at work directing the new version of the scene with Sara Chase and Nick Cordero — and I’m happy to report that this pivotal moment works so much better than it ever did. It’s now funny and compelling and a bit heartbreaking. It’s a good lesson — always take your characters’ journeys seriously, no matter how broad the comedy.

OH, AND SORRY ABOUT ALL THE CAPITAL LETTERS BEFORE. THEY’RE A LITTLE OBNOXIOUS.

yours in lower case,
Joe